In the past it's always been a bit of a problem getting a monitoring signal out of a DSLR so other people can watch. Indiespot.tv caught up with Teradek's Rod Clark at the DV Expo.

Fine if you're a one man band DSLR videographer, but imagine the following scenarios:

1) you're making a short film on a budget, with actors and extras involved, then the director will want to see the camera's output.

2) you've got a technically complex shot requring: a crane, a jib, or a long dolly move, or a tracking shot which you can't monitor because you're making sure you don't fall over. Once again the director or your assistant will need to see the camera's output.

Now Teradek have come up with the solution, streaming video over a wifi connection. Check out some of the videos.

Cube is the world’s first camera-top wireless HD video encoder. It streams up to 1080p over WiFi or wired Ethernet. Cube is the ideal solution for guerilla filmmakers who need on-set video monitoring without the cost or complexity of a full VTR rig. Cube is also a great solution for full-scale film productions to eliminate camera tethering on long dolly moves, running footage, steadicam shots, hand-held operation, jib-arms, and crane shots.

Cube’s ad-hoc networking mode creates a network and streams directly to a decoding device such as a Laptop or iPad with no other equipment required. Using Cube’s infrastructure network mode Cube’s IP video stream can be distributed over a LAN/WAN or over the Internet. Cube uses the world’s most advanced video compression – H.264 High Profile Level 4.1 and provides Blu-ray video quality. Cube’s end-to-end latency is approximately 1/8-1/2 second.

Cube is tiny (about the size of a deck of cards), uses only 2.5W of DC power, and weighs only 7 ounces, and mounts easily to a rail system, cage, hotshoe, or camera baseplate. Cube’s line-of-sight WiFi range is approximately 300 feet when used with a high quality WiFi access point. Cube has been tested extensively with RED ONE**, Arri Alexa, Panavision Genesis, Canon 5Dii, Canon 7D, various handi-cams and more.


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