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TOPIC: How to remain the original file size during the export?

How to remain the original file size during the export? 16 Dec 2016 14:31 #84055

  • marianssen
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Hi everyone,

I have edited some details inside of a few mp4 4k videos, not changing the final length of the video. The original size of a single video was around 16 GB. After export to mp4 again, the size is around half the original size. The client suggested that the final size should be around the same.
Is there any way I could retain the original file size during the export? I have tried all of the mp4 settings, and none seem to work. Also, is there a decline in quality, since the file size is half of the original?

Thank you
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How to remain the original file size during the export? 19 Dec 2016 16:20 #84101

  • bogiesan
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MP4 is a container that can use H.264 which is heavily compressed but largely lossless. The share operation using H.264 will compress your video because you have invoked a heavy compressor. The file size will be much smaller because you have asked for heavy compression. The only way you can maintain the exact pixel-to-pixel relationship is to use uncompressed output during the share operation. But I don't think you'll like the results because your client is gong to try to play them back using an mP4 player.

Try to work this out backwards. What's the playback or display device? Share /export out of FCPX or Compressor using the highest quality codec the playback device will support.

from www.makeuseof.com/tag/all-you-need-to-kn...ers-and-compression/
MP4 is the recommended format for uploading video to the web, and services such as Vimeo and YouTube have it listed as their preferred format. The MP4 container utilizes MPEG-4 encoding, or H.264, as well as AAC or AC3 for audio. It’s widely supported on most consumer devices, and the most common container used for online video. You really can’t go wrong with MP4.The bottom line is, a container is a (mostly) useless bit of information when referring to video. Telling someone to send you an MP4 file doesn’t give away any useful bits of information without understanding how the video and audio itself were encoded. The container is just that, a place to store the audio, video and the codecs needed to decode them for playback.

So, ultimately if you’re looking for advice on what to use, H.264 is quickly becoming the standard codec, while either mp4 or MKV are worthy containers. MP4 might get the edge here because it is better supported in consumer devices, and is the standard for most large streaming video sites. Ultimately, the choice is yours, and as long as the video can be decoded and played on the other end, there really aren’t a lot of bad choices you can make in terms of what to use.
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How to remain the original file size during the export? 20 Dec 2016 23:07 #84146

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marianssen wrote:
Hi everyone,

I have edited some details inside of a few mp4 4k videos, not changing the final length of the video. The original size of a single video was around 16 GB. After export to mp4 again, the size is around half the original size. The client suggested that the final size should be around the same...

If the 16 GB mp4 4k file was straight from the camera, it could be in a bit rate as high as 200 mbps (depending on the camera). By default when you export from FCPX using Share>Master File>Settings>Format: Computer, and Video Codec: H264, it encodes at about 30 megabit/sec for 4k. That is pretty fast and produces good quality for most purposes, and enables upload and transfer to a wide range of devices.

However the bit rate may not be as fast as the original camera file, so the file will be smaller. Whether a higher bit rate is needed is a video engineering decision requiring test and evaluation. If your customer just wants a big file you can export it as ProRes and it will be really big, if that makes him happy.

You can export the file at whatever bit rate you want using Compressor.
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How to remain the original file size during the export? 21 Dec 2016 00:03 #84147

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Hmm, clients have a way of asking for things that they don't really understand.

Client needs to explain the use.
For further post work it should be ProRes and it'll be big.
If just for viewing that depends on what. YouTube and Vimeo will get compressed again.
For desktop playing it may depend on the range of computers playing it.

The request doesn't make sense unless the client provides a sensible explanation.
I find the clients who know what they want will usually explain why and the ones who don't will ask for something and not give a reason because they really don't understand the reason. Just my not so humble opinion.

BTW figuring file size estimate is really high school math or earlier. Size is duration times bit rate. There some variation on that but a good encoder should generally get you within 10% of the target.
Last Edit: 21 Dec 2016 00:07 by cseeman.
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How to remain the original file size during the export? 21 Dec 2016 07:12 #84149

marianssen wrote:
…. The client suggested that the final size should be around the same.…


no help, just venting:
was that white-collar-stupid for many years myself - but what does the client care for file-sizes??

ask him, what GOP-structure, motion-prediction and chroma-quantisation he wants (or whatever tech-bubble in topic compression is at hand)!! :blink:

..... he hired you for quality. If he knows better (he doesn't) why isn't he doing the job on his own??

No, for real:
size vs. quality, that simple. And every 'processing' adds loss. Simple.

omg.
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How to remain the original file size during the export? 22 Dec 2016 10:48 #84195

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Thanks everyone for the tips. The client had the final video ready, I was just doing some colouring and other edits, but the final length stayed the same.

Anyway, the problem was with the Final Cut and Compressor MP4 settings. It turns out Final Cut and Compressor are not able to render MP4 in bitrate larger than 30000, while the original file was 60000. I found a workaround to render in 60000 in mov, and then re-render in 60000 in Adobe Media Encoder to MP4.
I guess there would be no difference when watching the file on a PC or a computer, but there might be one when projecting.
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How to remain the original file size during the export? 22 Dec 2016 12:05 #84197

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I'd never use an MP4 when showing on a projector, even at a 6K bit rate. Even on a projector I doubt you see significant differences between 3K and 6K. Those are really high for the major compression with an MP4. What is the final viewing of this file really going to be on?
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How to remain the original file size during the export? 22 Dec 2016 12:44 #84199

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marianssen wrote:
...It turns out Final Cut and Compressor are not able to render MP4 in bitrate larger than 30000, while the original file was 60000....

Compressor can easily export in whatever bitrate you want. I just imported a 100 megabit/sec H264 4K file from a Panasonic DVX200, exported to Compressor and made a custom preset using 60 megabit/sec H264. Inspection of the output file with Invisor showed it was 60 mbps. I then repeated this at 100 megabit/sec and the output file was 100 megabit/sec.

To do this:

(1) In FCPX, select timeline or range on timeline
(2) File>Send to Compressor
(3) In Compressor left sidebar under Video Sharing Services, pick 4K, right-click and pick "duplicate". That makes a copy of this preset under the Custom sidebar region, which can then be modified.
(4) Select the preset you duplicated, and in the right sidebar, under Video tab, and under Video Properties, pick Date Rate: Custom
(5) Enter whatever output data rate you want, such as 100,000 kbps (100 mbps)
(6) Drag your customized preset from the left sidebar on the project in the middle you exported from FCPX, then press Start Batch at the lower right. The file will be encoded at whatever setting you selected in your customized preset.

I'm not an expert at Compressor and there may be a better way, but this is how I do it. Once your custom preset is modified, it will stay there and you can use it quickly by just dragging it on the project in Compressor.

The video file inspection tool I use is Invisor: itunes.apple.com/us/app/invisor-media-fi...or/id442947586?mt=12
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How to remain the original file size during the export? 22 Dec 2016 15:59 #84200

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Once you have a custom preset created in Compressor, go to FCPX and in the Preferences > Destinations, create a custom Destination in FCPX using that custom preset. Save much more time and do it all right there in FCPX's Share menu.
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