Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Stabilizing 4K-footage does not look good!

Stabilizing 4K-footage does not look good! 07 Jan 2019 20:43 #98420

  • Neguah
  • Neguah's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 551
  • Thank you received: 5
  • Karma: 1


First clip is 1920x1080, second is 3840x2160. Both stabilized using the automatic feature in FCPX. Tried to change some values, but didn't do much. Both is shot with 400mm, handheld. As you can see, the 4K-footage turns out all wobbling. This happens even on 135mm (handheld). Pretty much just 50mm turns out good. But I rarely have to stabilize 50mm.

Any idea why this happens with 4K-footage?

PS: This might also happen without stabilization. So it might not be the stabilization feature in FCPX. I shoot with 5d mk4
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Stabilizing 4K-footage does not look good! 07 Jan 2019 22:20 #98421

  • joema
  • joema's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1156
  • Thank you received: 239
  • Karma: 21
This is very common, and is why I (1) Try to avoid digital stabilization in post, and (2) Use several different stabilizing software packages.

It does seem worse with modern 4k cameras than with older small-sensor DV and 1080p camcorders. Part of this might be the change from a "global shutter" which was instantly sampled to larger sensors which have sequential readout. This is similar to what causes "jello effect".

Another complication (esp on telephoto shots) is parallax shift. Even slight camera movements causes the subject to shift in front of the background. From moment to moment small background details are hidden or revealed. If the camera frame shakes, the viewer sees that so the slight parallax shift seems normal.

But if digitally stabilized, the image is cropped and lateral distance from subject to frame edge is maintained constant. But the stabilizer can't hide the parallax shift. When the shift happens on a stabilized image it looks abnormal.

The best approach is use optical or physical stabilization when shooting. Each digital stabilizer uses different algorithms to try and get around these problems. You just have to try several of them (and pay for them).

Crumplepop's Better Stabilizer plugin sometimes works better than FCPX:
www.crumplepop.com/product/fcpx-premiere...in-betterstabilizer/

I also use Core Melt's Lock and Load: coremelt.com/products/lock-and-load-x

The Warp stabilizer in Premiere Pro works well but it's very slow.

The Mercalli stabilizer is a stand-alone app (on Mac) and overall it works very well. But it's a hassle to use since you must export to ProRes, import to Mercalli, then re-export and re-import to FCPX: www.prodad.com/Video-Stabilization-for-P...-Mac-48950,l-us.html
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Stabilizing 4K-footage does not look good! 09 Jan 2019 08:04 #98440

  • Neguah
  • Neguah's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 551
  • Thank you received: 5
  • Karma: 1
Many thanks, joema for your great answer! I'll make sure to take a closer look to the plugin you mention. And clearly handheld is with tele is no longer an option (if I want to continue shooting 4K).
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Stabilizing 4K-footage does not look good! 09 Jan 2019 11:38 #98441

  • joema
  • joema's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 1156
  • Thank you received: 239
  • Karma: 21
400mm is almost impossible to hand hold. An optically stabilized lens helps a bit and a few cameras have both sensor-based and lens-based stabilization. But in general the longest lens I would hand hold would be 200mm (on a full frame camera), and that assumes the lens has good optical stabilization.

The Panasonic GH5 has excellent sensor-based stabilization, achievable since the small micro-4/3 sensor has plenty of mobility inside the chassis. Your 5D Mark IV has no sensor-based stabilization, and even my Sony A7RIII (which does have that) cannot really shoot 400mm hand held.

For a Safari, hike or mobile documentary work, one of the best solutions is a high quality monopod. I use the Manfrotto MVMXPRO500US: www.amazon.com/dp/B01MDR8K49/

There is also a 5-section carbon fiber version of it.
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Stabilizing 4K-footage does not look good! 22 Feb 2019 21:20 #99011

  • Neguah
  • Neguah's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Platinum Boarder
  • Posts: 551
  • Thank you received: 5
  • Karma: 1
The lens I'm using is a 100-400mm Sigma. The stabilization is far from good, and the Canon as beyond better. But since I mainly use this for timelapse, Sigma can hold focus much longer than Canon.

I actually see some bad 4K footage from 35mm as well. So, I'm not very impressed. I will go for a monopod for sure. I will also consider the GH5 for video with longer focal range.

Thanks for your input!
The administrator has disabled public write access.

Stabilizing 4K-footage does not look good! 23 Feb 2019 16:22 #99014

  • Paul Anderegg
  • Paul Anderegg's Avatar
  • OFFLINE
  • Junior Boarder
  • Posts: 30
  • Thank you received: 3
  • Karma: 0
You are seeing the effects of INERTIACAM stabilizer, you want to you SMOOTHCAM. SmoothCam also gives you the option for Tripod Mode, assuming you are able to keep your RAW clip stable enough for the points of lock down to remain in the frame, or cut of the head and tail of the clip that might have enough motion to disturb Tripod Mode. I stabilize all the time for ENG, so I have gotten pretty good at holding my breath, framing for the knowledge that there will be a slight crop, and looking for sharp contrasty things to keep in the frame for Tripod Mode to key off of. InertiaCam has always had that jello effect, and it has to do with the way it tries to manipulate the scene movement. SmoothCam if attempted on very heavy movement in a scene can produce those black "off the edge of the shot" areas like you see on YouTube or FB auto-stabilized cell phone video. And I find 4K much easier to stabilize in FCPX due to the extra pixels to work with, especially when downsizing for HD output. FCPX also prefers 60p for stabilization over 24/30p, as the transitions between frames and movement are much easier to keep smooth.
The administrator has disabled public write access.