large_fcpx_project

***Updated***

We have all seen how snappy the operation of Final Cut Pro X is in demos, but what about the operational speed with a large real life project with lots of clips and keywords?

FCPX user Chris Blyth has had a frustrating time working FCPX that we will attempt to show by posting his YouTube videos. It looks like everything slows up when drawing thumbnails and trying to apply keywords when you have a lot of clips. Maybe he is doing something wrong and a reader will be able to chip in with a tip, however we have a gut feeling that the slowdown is caused by the sheer amount of data and clips he has.

Cris Blyth contacted us about our post and felt that the videos weren't really for prime time yet so we have removed them. We think we can sum up the videos by saying that using that amount of clips and data really bogs FCPX down. He asked us to point out that he personally feels that Apple is really working hard on these updates, and thinks that they will resolve them soon too.

"I don't think the problem is the amount of clips in total, but simply how many are shown at once. i.e. once you split them into Event's or keywords, it really becomes a very quick tool. - oh, also, it wasn't 3344 clips, it's actually over 16,000 clips. Think of having 16,000 clips in ONE bin in FCP7.. I think not. :) The fact that FXPx manages it at all is impressive."

He admits to liking to test things properly and has offered us a more detailed report when he has finished working on his latest project that was shown in the videos.

"We just returned from filming for 2 months in Africa with 5.5 TB of footage. We have several systems; one that is a standard FCS7 setup and another that is setup the same, but running·FCPx. Now, for the FCS system we had to transcode that 5.5TB of footage and that data is around 18TB. So, we wanted to try out FCPx but without all that transcoding."

We are going to look forward to Cris's further findings on how FCPX deals with large amounts of data and clips. No stranger to spending a lot of time in front of a computer screen, he was a vfx supervisor at Digital Domain and now directs commercials and makes documentaries. You can find out more over on his website·Crisblyth.com