may tutorial roundup

It has been a quiet week for Final Cut Pro news, so that gives us the ideal chance to catch up on the latest free FCPX and Motion tutorials. One thing we have noticed from the last time we did a tutorial roundup is that there are a lot, lot more tutorials being produced.

Let us just mention that if you haven't seen the videos from the FCPExchange event at NAB, they are well worth a watch and contain a lot of information as well. 

First 4 videos from FCPXExchange.

Second 4 videos from FCPExchange.

Last 3 videos from FCPExchange.

On to the tutorials and first up has to be Simon Ubsdell's Library 'super search' tool. By creating an all encompassing Smart Collection and hiding the Library, a 'search HUD' can be used. That is if the media has the right metadata. You might also like to checkout the rather heated debate on our Forum about this very clever trick.

 

Do you like kinetic typography? This short tutorial from Simple Video Making shows how to animate words in Motion. No verbal instructions, but easy to follow along.

 

This next tutorial from Haugen Creative shows the syncing of a four camera shoot from FCPX in Pluraleyes. Now, we have to ask the question why didn't he sync the clips up in FCPX using the audio. We don't know but it does show the workflow and that might be important tif you have a very long multi camera job that fails syncing in FCPX.

 

Red Giant to the rescue here as they have published a video that dives deeper into the PluralEyes/FCPX workflow.

 

Another short voiceless tutorial, this one about using FCPX markers from Sony Ci. Frame.io and Wipster have taken all the limelight on online approval tools, so it is interesting to see this type of interaction with Sony's online approval platform. Want to try Ci out? You can get a free workspace here.

 

The next tutorial does have narration, but for us unfortunately our Spanish isn't up to understanding the words! We posted it because we didn't think about using the chromakeyer for skin smoothing- very clever work from Luis Velázquez. The automatic translation subtitles do help a little, if rather comically. 

 

AV-Ultra has a series of four Motion tutorials ranging from an introduction to the application, keyframes, text behaviours and dropzones. We have embedded all four in the playlist below. There is also an eight part FCPX set on YouTube.

 

As we said, there are many, many more FCXP tutorials on YouTube. A lot of them are not up to a particularly high standard, but it does provide an indication on how widely FCPX is being used.