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TOPIC: Editing Exposure set to Black and White a good practice?

Editing Exposure set to Black and White a good practice? 06 Aug 2018 18:08 #96722

  • bradywurtz
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So i've been asked by a wedding client if i can do a black and white edit of their wedding video I did for them. I said yes sure, sounds fun.

I go back to my project, and I added a Color Board effect with the global Saturation pulled down to the first clip, then copied and pasted it to all the clips. And then I noticed something, my contrast wasn't so good on my original edit.

Looking at the black and white version of my video now, there are some shots that seem very washed out and some that seem perfect. When i was editing in color it just didn't stand out to me as much, but without saturation, it's very obvious

Is it a good practice to maybe play around with desaturating a whole project just to help set proper levels? I feel like i'm always struggling with color and levels (i don't think i'm terrible, but i feel like i'm constantly learning something new or finding out something i'm doing wrong), and this might be the crutch i need to make sure i'm leveling my footage correctly to start with
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Editing Exposure set to Black and White a good practice? 06 Aug 2018 18:45 #96723

  • Tom Wolsky
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Rather than just desaturating, try using the Black & White effect. Try pulling down the red and pushing up the green in the B&W color controls.
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Editing Exposure set to Black and White a good practice? 06 Aug 2018 19:03 #96724

  • thinkfilm
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I found this very useful from Mark Spencer of Ripple Training:
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Editing Exposure set to Black and White a good practice? 06 Aug 2018 19:13 #96725

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@thinkfilm

Watching it now! I'm so amazed at how little I know all the time! This helps a ton!
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Editing Exposure set to Black and White a good practice? 06 Aug 2018 19:26 #96726

  • zoombeee
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Thank you for sharing. This video is very useful. :)
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Editing Exposure set to Black and White a good practice? 06 Aug 2018 20:47 #96728

  • Axel
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Yes, I heard of this method. I think it's not very useful (referring to the desaturation before determining contrast). Here is why: it's more difficult to judge relative saturation (haha!). My brother could use it, he can even guess colors in a completely desaturated image. I don't know how this works, but he is about 90% right.

Furthermore, when you shoot weddings, you may have not too few bright highkey-shots, where real black should be absent. The start is usually to determine the white point and the black point (no deep black = levels above zero, no actual light in the scene = below 100), then the mids. Even if the image is intentionally kind of hazy (not: flat), you can increase the overall impression of contrast by lowering the midtones, but I stop before I accidentally make my clips too dark. I do the final contrast adjustment in a last run, by using the luma curve and bending it slightly up or down from the middle. I fix contrast ratio first, exposure at last.

With modern TV sets (> HDR), it's crucial not to crush blacks, unless you want to have black holes, you could rather let lights clip. It's impossible to judge blacks on an iMac display, for instance, with just your eyes. You need the waveform for that. For the mids, the waveform isn't that reliable, because all clips in a sequence are not lit identically, not even all faces in a room within one shot with different positions to the window. Therefore exposure is more demanding.
Last Edit: 06 Aug 2018 20:48 by Axel.
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